Motorists alert after 158,000+ fake car parts seized

By Angel Chan

Fake parts can lead to breakdowns, accidents and injury

DUBAI 8 November 2017: With the recent destruction by authorities in Ajman of a major haul of fake spare parts, premium aftermarket supplier ACDelco is highlighting the dangers of purchasing counterfeit parts and warning Middle East customers to be vigilant when purchasing any auto parts.

While fake parts may often be less expensive to buy, the cost can prove to be far higher in the long run, and not just financially. Imitation parts typically don’t last as long as genuine parts, making it necessary to replace them more frequently. Typically, these parts aren’t built to a particular car’s specifications, which can also lead to mechanical problems and breakdowns. Worst of all, fake auto parts can have major safety implications, especially when buying parts such as brakes.

Mohammed Al Fayyad, Director of Aftersales at General Motors Middle East, commented: “The counterfeit parts market is a major focus of attention for ACDelco, which continuously works with authorities across the Middle East to minimize the chances of customers unknowingly purchasing low quality fake parts.”

ACDelco Shock Absorber

Some 158,400 fake spare parts were discovered in a joint operation between the Department of Economic Development – Ajman and Ajman Police earlier this year, with ACDelco closely involved from the moment of the first raid right through to the destruction of the parts. A number of manufacturers worked with the authorities on the case, with ACDelco alone listing approximately 10,000 fake parts, predominantly oil filters, among the seizure.

The Middle East auto parts market continues to prove a major lure for unscrupulous criminals – the counterfeit parts trade alone is worth almost $1 billion a year. Demonstrating the on-going challenges facing all organizations, earlier this year more than 500,000 counterfeit car parts were discovered in a raid in Al Ain, UAE. In February 2013, law enforcement agencies and Customs in Saudi Arabia, in cooperation with General Motors, seized more than 50,000 ACDelco counterfeit products alone.